Thursday, June 4, 2015

=Food Hunt= TWG Tea Saloon

Started serving tea since 2008 in Singapore, Twg tea salon serves more than 800 varieties of tea. However, by writing this introduction post, is solely with the intention to introduce their tea properly, so than next time when you visit the salon again you will enjoy and appreciate the tea.

Noted: The English descriptions for the tea are the original text from the Twg tea book



Many peoples have been to Twg for tea. However, many peoples misunderstand their no refill policy as well, because what they served is already the best from the tea leaves, and there are no leaves in the pot, what is the point to refill?



In Twg, although they have more than 800 varieties of tea, they basically divided into 12 types, which is white tea, yellow tea, green tea (2 types), blue tea (2 types), black tea, red tea, matured tea, tea flowers, compressed tea and their most famous tea blends.

White Tea

White tea is a rare delicacy, consisting of the first few tender leaves and new buds of the tea tree, harvested in early springtime. Totally unprocessed, white tea leaves are simply picked and sun-dried, and consequently retain the highest concentration of antioxidants.

Yellow Tea

The rarest and most expensive tea in the world, yellow tea dates back to the 16th century, when it was served at the imperial court of China. Grown on a single mountain range in China, yellow tea is harvested on just one day a year, yielding only a few kilograms of finished tea.

Green Tea- Chinese

Green tea leaves are not oxidised, thereby retaining their natural green colour and delicate flavour. To prevent the natural process of oxidation from occurring, this technique is employed: Chinese Method: The freshly picked leaves are immediately pan-fried in heated copper basins over a fire at 100°C to dehydrate the leaves.This method is used to process green teas such as Lung Ching, Chun Mee and Gunpowder.

Green Tea- Japanese

Japanese Method, the tea leaves are gently steamed immediately after plucking. This process softens them for rolling by hand. Repeated several times before drying, the leaves are then sorted into different grades. Quality is assessed by the color, fragrance and appearance of the leaves.

Blue Tea-China

Commonly known as oolong or “Black Dragon” tea, blue tea is semi-fermented. It combines the fresh fragrance of green tea with the rich and aromatic complexity of black tea. Blue teas are mainly produced in Formosa and in the south-eastern coastal provinces of Fujian and Guangdong in China. Excellent oolongs are also produced in other countries in South East Asia. There are two methods of producing blue tea. For the Chinese Method, the oxidation process varies between 12% and 15%, and yields a pale green cup with a woody astringency and fruity flavour. In the Formosa Method, the oxidation period varies between 60% and 70%, yielding a golden cup with a deeper, richer aroma.

Blue Tea-Taiwan

Commonly known as oolong or “Black Dragon” tea, blue tea is semi-fermented. It combines the fresh fragrance of green tea with the rich and aromatic complexity of black tea. Blue teas are mainly produced in Formosa and in the south-eastern coastal provinces of Fujian and Guangdong in China. Excellent oolongs are also produced in other countries in South East Asia. There are two methods of producing blue tea. For the Chinese Method, the oxidation process varies between 12% and 15%, and yields a pale green cup with a woody astringency and fruity flavour. In the Formosa Method, the oxidation period varies between 60% and 70%, yielding a golden cup with a deeper, richer aroma.

Black Tea
Black tea is completely oxidised and when processed, undergoes the five primary steps of withering, rolling, fermentation, drying and sorting. Full-bodied yet mild, these teas are generally classified based on leaf grades and strength.



Matured Tea

Also known as Pu-Erh, matured teas can be found either loose or compressed. Unlike black tea, matured tea undergoes a secondary oxidation and fermentation. Plucked leaves are spread out in the sun to wilt and are then pan-fried to prevent further oxidation. Rolled and shaped, they are dried in the sun again. Then, pressed into cakes or left uncompressed, they undergo several fermentation processes in specially conceived tea cellars and are sold at maturity. As with some fine wines, certain matured teas are renowned for improving with age. All TWG Tea matured teas are at least 7 years old.

Red Tea
Red tea, or rooibos, is produced from a bush known as the Aspalathus linearis in South Africa. Red tea leaves are generally oxidized – a process which enhances the flavour and produces the distinctive red colour after which this tea is named. The harvests can be classified by the needle percentage or leaf-tostem content in the tea. A higher leaf content will result in a darker infusion, richer flavour and smoother aftertaste. A South African national beverage, this „tea‟ is 100% theine-free, contains a high level of antioxidants and is very rich in vitamin C, mineral salts and protein.

Tea Flowers

Crafted in China, tea flowers are composed of tea leaves sewn by hand in an artisanal manner into compact shapes that „bloom‟ when infused at the bottom of a teacup or teapot. Often blended with fragrant flowers, like jasmine, dragon lily, rose and osmanthus.

Compressed Tea

During the Tang Dynasty in China, teas were compressed into bricks or cakes in accordance with the preparation of boiled tea, and are often referred to as Bian Xiao Cha, or “tea for beyond the border”.



Tea Blends

Twg blends the tea with vegetables, flower, spices even chocolate to create many types of tea blends, and their famous and first ever blends is Silver Moon, this is a green tea blends, which is accented with a grand berry and vanilla bouquet, smooth, with just a hint of spice.

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